Swing in American Art

Swing in American Art

Today we’ll be taking a miniature tour of jazz and Lindy hop in American visual art. I was inspired to explore the topic after coming across some stunning images by the early cartoonist E. Simms Campbell, who created several prints and watercolors of 1930s Harlem culture. I figured other swing dancers might enjoy his illustrations, so here they are—plus art from several other artists besides: Frank Myers, William H. Johnson, and Richard Yarde.

Coming In June at Boulder Swing Dance

Coming In June at Boulder Swing Dance

June is jam-packed with dance opportunities. From our Intermediate Balboa classes in Level 2.5, to our beginner series at SKEYE Brewing there's a lesson for everyone this month. Join us also for our Beginner's Bootcamp in prep for the 1940s ball June 11th, and our swing social at NCAR June 24th. Click here to find out everything we have in store for June!

Swing Out in Style: An Illustrated Overview of Swing Era Fashion

Swing Out in Style: An Illustrated Overview of Swing Era Fashion

You've probably noticed that swing dance events tend to showcase a particular clothing style. Contemporary but with clear vintage influences, it borrows elements from a wide span of decades. Bow ties, oxfords, pageboy caps, shirtwaist and drop-waist dresses, bow blouses.... Sound familiar?

If you've ever wondered which style elements come from which era, or which societal changes influenced American trends over the years, you're in luck! Let's take a tour of jazz era style through the decades.

Ella Fitzgerald: The Queen of Jazz

Ella Fitzgerald: The Queen of Jazz

Ella Fitzgerald's recordings capture many of the jazz era's best-known songs, like "Summertime," "My Funny Valentine," and "It Don't Mean A Thing If It Ain't Got that Swing." Every jazz fan knows her music, or at least some of it—she was a famously prolific musician, with over 200 albums to her name. But what else do you know about the First Lady of Swing? Click here to read more...